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Tuesday, 24 April 2018

Premiere: Arno Stolz - The Track (Raffa FL Remix) [Proper Musique]



you know, there is that much illegal war profiteering going on, a blind man could follow , "the Track", from their fuckery tank as, standardz, hahahahaha, :) #edio

Shannon Davin - Tilted Pillz (Original Mix)



you know, they have tried to make the world that crazy, that it should be on, "Tilted Pills", to get it's Groove straightened out as, standardz, hahahahahaha, :) #edio

Del Fonda, Designerz - Solid (Original Mix)



you know, nothing is as it seems, even what we perceive to be, "Solid", is just a bunch of electrical impulses in the brain, from your bodies electrical interaction, with the vibration energy chains of the object as, standardz, hahahahahaha, :) #edio
🌍☮️♻️πŸŒπŸ—»♻️πŸ˜‡✌️
https://ello.co/edio1
www.ediobangers.blogspot.co.uk/
https://plus.google.com/+ediobangerz
www.facebook.com/ruffneckbase/ 
https://www.facebook.com/ruffneckbass01/
www.ediovision.blogspot.com/
www.facebook.com/ediovision/
www.facebook.com/thematrixhasyouwakeup/
www.facebook.com/peelingbacktheveil/
https://www.facebook.com/RealtimehdEarthviewingexperiment/
also i have a YouTube page, it has a copy of all my latest tracks,5000+ and if you keep going back, pretty much every track I've ever posted, just go to liked video's, and hit play all, and then you won't have to keep pressing play, but unfortunately you wont get to read, what i write, but you will get access, to a constant stream of tracks, for over a 2 years solid play time, but you know, ya can't have it all looolz ;)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-jBy5vUUUTItELLXQbcE9w
🌍☮️♻️πŸŒπŸ—»♻️πŸ˜‡✌️

Tender H – Between Times (Meek Remix)



you know, there are good times and there are bad times, and then there are, "Between Times", which i like to call the fuckery times, and to stop us getting to the bad times, or should i say worse times, we have to introduce a little fuckery of our own, it's time to rise as, standardz, hahahahahaha, :) #edio

Flashmob - The Lone Brazilian [Hot Creations]





you know, theres that much fuckery, it's like a jungle and i feel like, "The Lone Brazilian", wandering in the trees as, standardz, hahahahahaha, :) #edio

PREMIERE | Katze - Abstractions (Original Mix)



you know, i hope you take your time to read what i wrote, and open the links, as i think you will find it all pretty self explanatory and enlightening, there are no complicated, "Abstractions", of social concepts, it's just facts and the truth as, standardz, hahahahaha, :) #edio

PREMIERE | Katze - Follow Us (Original Mix)



you know, i know there are areas around the globe, where you are unable to speak on fb, as it's that heavily monitored and used as evidence, even though words do not prove intent or guilt, i could say i can fly to the moon and back, in under 3 minutes, but i doesnt mean its true, but if for whatever reason you cannot comment freely just, "Follow Us", and please don't put comments with adverts on them for videos or your own pages without my permission, it's cheeky A.F as, standardz, hahahahahahahahahaha, :) #edio

Premiere: Brav0 & AIA - Ah Ha (Minimal)



you know, i always get it right, and i know, when you saw that post you were like, "Ah Ha", he's right, would you expect anything less from me by now as, standardz, hahahahaha, :) #edio
🌍☮️♻️πŸŒπŸ—»♻️πŸ˜‡✌️
https://ello.co/edio1
www.ediobangers.blogspot.co.uk/
https://plus.google.com/+ediobangerz
www.facebook.com/ruffneckbase/ 
https://www.facebook.com/ruffneckbass01/
www.ediovision.blogspot.com/
www.facebook.com/ediovision/
www.facebook.com/thematrixhasyouwakeup/
www.facebook.com/peelingbacktheveil/
https://www.facebook.com/RealtimehdEarthviewingexperiment/
also i have a YouTube page, it has a copy of all my latest tracks,5000+ and if you keep going back, pretty much every track I've ever posted, just go to liked video's, and hit play all, and then you won't have to keep pressing play, but unfortunately you wont get to read, what i write, but you will get access, to a constant stream of tracks, for over a 2 years solid play time, but you know, ya can't have it all looolz ;)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-jBy5vUUUTItELLXQbcE9w
🌍☮️♻️πŸŒπŸ—»♻️πŸ˜‡✌️

PREMIERE | Ilija Djokovic - Venom (Original Mix)



ammmmm back mo fo's, for another epic journey, in the unknown realms of rhythm and bass!!, and you know, it's time to fix the world, with some vibrational anti, "Venom", and get back deep in to the Groove, So sit back, plug in, turn up, do whatever it is, you have to do!!, to enjoy the music!, that much more!, Control this is, flight 420 requesting, go no/go!, on primary?, this is control, permission to get, L.A.F, and go for, full blaze!!, you better, strap yourself in, quick time!, because we, have a launch in progress, in t - minus 10 seconds and counting down, hope your ready!,........ 5.......4.......3.......2.......1.......0 power to all drive's, crank up the phonic reactor, engage harmonic reinforcement, increase the warp, bubble, charge barium crystal capacitor's, activate inertial dampening field, navigation on-line, and retract the umbilical, mirror, signal, manoeuvre, and we, are away!, standardz, hahahahahaha, :) #edio
🌍☮️♻️πŸŒπŸ—»♻️πŸ˜‡✌️
https://ello.co/edio1
www.ediobangers.blogspot.co.uk/
https://plus.google.com/+ediobangerz
www.facebook.com/ruffneckbase/ 
https://www.facebook.com/ruffneckbass01/
www.ediovision.blogspot.com/
www.facebook.com/ediovision/
www.facebook.com/thematrixhasyouwakeup/
www.facebook.com/peelingbacktheveil/
https://www.facebook.com/RealtimehdEarthviewingexperiment/
also i have a YouTube page, it has a copy of all my latest tracks,5000+ and if you keep going back, pretty much every track I've ever posted, just go to liked video's, and hit play all, and then you won't have to keep pressing play, but unfortunately you wont get to read, what i write, but you will get access, to a constant stream of tracks, for over a 2 years solid play time, but you know, ya can't have it all looolz ;)
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-jBy5vUUUTItELLXQbcE9w
🌍☮️♻️πŸŒπŸ—»♻️πŸ˜‡✌️

The Reason For Bombing Syria,, read me for the evidence


The Real Reason For Bombing Syria, 


its the same reason as for all conflicts globally, and the reason why lot of Peep's recently have been getting sick with Cancer's, and all sorts of nasty diseases, its not even about who's right, or who's wrong, or which is the better ideology, or religion, to put it quite simply, it's the Greed and Corruption of the worlds Government's 100%, they've even engineered the whole thing, so they could profit the most from it, and it started when they privatised Britain's public systems and services, which they did so they could buy up all the stock and shares on the quiet, and maximise their profit by manipulating the system with insider knowledge, IE making bombs then starting fights, and dosing us all with massive levels of pollutants, poisons and toxins, knowing they own the entire health care system, so you have to pay them, to be treated for illnesses they have caused, (not cured BTW, which is easy to do, but instead they just to treat the illness or should i say the symptoms, of the artificial man made bacteria that is causing it, as it ensures repeat custom), its the biggest conspiracy that the world has ever seen or known of, and i'm going to show you a lot of evidence, like the list of mp's with direct links to the arms manufacturing companies and the health care system, and all the Mp's financial interest's, (what they own), by name of mp and company, and which Mp's attend dinners and conferences to showcase new weapons and methods of global genocide, all paid for by the arms manufacturing industry, and I'm posting a list of all the Mp's financial interest's, by name of mp and company, who pays them bribes, and a whole lot more, i know, you came here for the Groove, but i think we all agree, that world peace is worth a moment of anyone's time, and then, it's back to the groove as, standardz, hahahahahahaha, :) #edio

illegal weapons and arms manufacturing government fuckery:

Government says UK's 'heart goes out' to wedding guests killed by Saudi bombs - but it won't stop selling country arms Instead the minister called for all sides to negotiate a peaceful settlement to the Yemen conflict, http://ediobangers.blogspot.co.uk/2018/04/government-says-uks-heart-goes-out-to.html

Vince Cable one of 40 MP's on guest list for arms dealers dinner in London, http://ediobangers.blogspot.co.uk/2018/04/vince-cable-one-of-40-mps-on-guest-list.html


UN-inquiry-into-Saudi-Arabia-war-crimes-in-Yemen-shelved-after-Saudi-opposition, http://ediobangers.blogspot.co.uk/2018/04/un-inquiry-into-saudi-arabia-war-crimes.html

MP's paid thousands of pounds from lobby groups Arms manufacturers, pharmaceutical firms and foreign governments have reportedly been paying hundreds of thousands of pounds to MPs and peers in parliamentary special interest groups. http://ediobangers.blogspot.co.uk/2018/04/mps-paid-thousands-of-pounds-from-lobby.html

MP's invest in arms and tobacco Secret papers show that Parliament's pension fund spends millions on 'unethical' investments, http://ediobangers.blogspot.co.uk/2018/04/mps-invest-in-arms-and-tobacco-secret.html

Dishonourable Members Conal Walsh uncovers the unethical investments behind MPs' pensions, http://ediobangers.blogspot.co.uk/2018/04/dishonorable-members-conal-walsh.html

Tory minister Gerald Howarth: friend of the arms trade, http://ediobangers.blogspot.co.uk/2018/04/tory-minister-gerald-howarth-friend-of.html


The new Brexit minister, the arms industry, the American hard right… and Equatorial Guinea, http://ediobangers.blogspot.co.uk/2018/04/the-new-brexit-minister-arms-industry.html

how the government want to sell your child's education, to the worlds largest arms manufacturers, while allowing them to brainwash your child, through mind control techniques and technology, and test their new killer products on your children, without your expressed knowledge or consent, (Wake Up!), http://ediobangers.blogspot.co.uk/2018/04/how-government-want-to-sell-your-childs.html

The Register of Members' declared Financial Interests  As at 161121, http://ediobangers.blogspot.co.uk/2018/04/the-register-of-members-financial.html


pro government arms fuckery, (arms and war pimping), A DEAL WORTH DEFENDING - the UKs arms trade and the war in Yemen, http://ediobangers.blogspot.co.uk/2018/04/pro-government-arms-fuckery-arms-and.html

US arms manufacturer with factory in Glenrothes develops 'lethal' missile steering system, identical to one's used in Yemen bombing, http://ediobangers.blogspot.co.uk/2018/04/us-arms-manufacturer-with-factory-in.html

illegal health care monopoly fuckery:

New intake brings number of disabled MPs in Commons to five Two new Labour MPs – Jared O’Mara and Marsha de Cordova – are part of the increase, but disability campaigners say more work needs to be done, as they are fail to adequately represent the British public, http://ediobangers.blogspot.co.uk/2018/04/new-intake-brings-number-of-disabled.html

Selling off NHS for profit': Full list of MPs with links to private healthcare firms, http://ediobangers.blogspot.co.uk/2018/04/selling-off-nhs-for-profit-full-list-of.html

Over 70 MPs Connected to Companies Involved in Private Healthcare, http://ediobangers.blogspot.co.uk/2018/04/over-70-mps-connected-to-companies.html



political propaganda and fake news fuckery!, 

Yemen wedding bombing: 15-year-old survivor tells of devastation wreaked on family party, and then instead of expressing the horror of seeing his entire family blown to pieces, he starts to reminisce about a visit to NASA, and how its a source of national pride, as he received an award, pfft it doesnt exist and neither does the paper, i looked, and he then goes on to talk about anything other than what a 15 year old boy having just watched his entire famz blown to bits, would say and should say, not even a scream of pain and sorrow yet nothing, its a complete fabrication, http://ediobangers.blogspot.co.uk/2018/04/political-propaganda-fuckery.html

40 Tory MPs attacks plans for snoopers' charter Government plans for a so-called snooper’s charter have taken a further blow after 40 Conservative MPs threatened to revolt over the plans, http://ediobangers.blogspot.co.uk/2018/04/40-tory-mps-attacks-plans-for-snoopers.html


The House of hypocrisy

The House of hypocrisy


It is such a familiar spectacle that we should all be used to it, but it still grates: MPs are again revealed as purveyors of double standards and hypocrisy.

Labour and Conservative MPs have preached financial responsibility and parsimony over the past 20 years, but many of them were simultaneously digging their snouts in the trough of financial sleaze at every opportunity. Today The Observer reveals that the same applies to their pensions.

MPs' retirement funds are invested in some of the most politically incorrect companies in Britain. Two reports - from the blue-blood City houses of Cazenove and Barings - show that the cash is in traditional capitalist villains such as tobacco, defence, oil and mining.

Gallaher, BAe Systems, Shell and RTZ have been lambasted for years in the House of Commons (overwhelmingly, it must be said, by Labour MPs) as cancer-peddling warmongers which exploit workers and despoil the earth. Yet, when it comes to protecting MPs' nest eggs, it seems they are acceptable after all.

Even where there are no health or human rights objections to the investments, there is plenty of scope for conflicts of interest - MPs are also big investors in media, telecommunications and banking - all sectors where politicians take an increasing interest via legislation or the regulators. MPs will say either that they didn't know their money - a handsome £300m all told - was in these companies, or that they could do nothing about it because the cash was being managed by those awful City types at Caz and Barings.

Untrue on both counts. They have access to the trustees, fellow MPs who receive, detailed annual statements of their investments, which say precisely where their money goes. And they could easily change their instructions to their fund managers, saying which sectors they did, and did not, wish to invest in.

Ironically, the revelation of parliamentary hypocrisy over pensions comes as the City is beginning to clean up its act. In the next few weeks, the financial authorities are launching the first officially 'ethical' index, the embarrassingly-named FTSE4Good. The compilers announced last week that they would exclude tobacco and arms companies from their list, as well as other firms that do not meet socially responsible investment criteria. It will be interesting to see which index performs better - the new squeaky clean FTSE4Good, or the dirty old All-Share. My money would be on the presumably renamed FTSE4Bad.

This initiative gives MPs a chance to clean up their act. The 7 June intake could get the ball rolling by insisting their cash is invested in the new index.

When it comes to the time for their senior citizen bus passes, their consciences will be clear. Of course, their pockets may well be lighter but, as a bunch of altruistic public servants, that shouldn't worry them, should it?

government spy network fuckery



The BBC worked directly with the British Security Service MI5 to politically vet job candidates to ensure those with left-wing views did not get offered jobs within the Corporation – a practice that the BBC and MI5 introduced to directly prevent a left-wing British government, a startling new report has revealed.

https://evolvepolitics.com/the-bbc-worked-directly-with-mi5-to-bar-left-wing-journalists-and-prevent-a-left-wing-british-government/

The staggering new information also reveals that the BBC’s policy of barring left-wing journalists continued into the 1990s, and that the Corporation’s Chiefs intentionally lied about the BBC using such methods to Official Employment tribunals.


In an article published today entitled ‘The vetting files: How the BBC kept out ‘subversives’’, the BBC write that:

“For decades the BBC denied that job applicants were subject to political vetting by MI5. But in fact vetting began in the early days of the BBC and continued until the 1990s…

“As early as 1933 a BBC executive, Col Alan Dawnay, had begun holding meetings to exchange information with the head of MI5, Sir Vernon Kell, at Dawnay’s flat in Eaton Terrace, Chelsea…

“These informal arrangements became formal two years later, with an agreement between the two organisations that all new staff should be vetted except “personnel such as charwomen”. The fear was that “evilly disposed” engineers might sabotage the network at a critical time, or that conspirators might discredit the BBC so that “the way could be made clear for a left-wing government”.

And so routine vetting began. From the start, the BBC undertook not to reveal the role of the Security Service (MI5), or the fact of vetting itself. On one level this made sense, bearing in mind that the very existence of the Secret Service remained a secret until the 1989 Security Service Act.”

The stunning article then goes on to reveal how the BBC rejected any candidate found to have even tenuous links to political organisations such as the Socialist Workers Party or Militant Tendency – even clarifying that “A banned applicant did not need to be a member of these organisations – association was enough.“

After vetting applicants, the BBC and MI5 made one of three assessments of a candidate:

Category A stated that: “The Security Service advises that the candidate should not be employed in a post offering direct opportunity to influence broadcast material for a subversive purpose.“

Candidates who were placed in “Category B” were said to be “advised” against employment “unless it is decided that other considerations are overriding”.

Whilst placing a candidate in Category C meant that the information found during vetting was not worrying enough to “necessarily debar” them from becoming employed, but the BBC “may prefer to make other arrangements” if the post offered “exceptional opportunity” for subversive activity.


Furthermore, if BBC Chiefs became suspicious of the activities of any employee, or when employees applied for a promotion that required extra political vetting, they would mark their personnel file with an “image resembling a Christmas tree“.

The Christmas Tree symbol was known as a “Standing Reminder”, and ensured that such candidates were “Not to be promoted or transferred (or placed on continuous contract) without reference to [Director of Personnel].”

The BBC article goes on to admit that they also ‘secretly removed‘ the Standing Reminder from an employee’s file if they went to an Official Employment Tribunal, and that an agreement was in place to lie to any employment tribunal by pretending that the symbol was simply related to “routine procedures” such as “Next of Kin, Pension etc”.

Despite officially claiming to have since ceased such political vetting of potential employees (except for those who would be involved in wartime broadcasting and those with access to secret government information) the staggering new information shows exactly how worried BBC Chiefs were about their employees holding even mildly anti-Establishment views.

And, given the BBC’s obvious ability to maintain closely guarded secrets, it would be incredibly naive to believe that such political scrutiny was not being still given to a large proportion of high-level BBC journalists to ensure they were ‘on message’ and would not divert from the BBC’s true agenda.

After all, the BBC is, and always has been, a propaganda arm of the rich and powerful in Britain – and it would be entirely foolish to believe that anything substantive has really changed at the top of the Corporation.

The BBC’s aim is not to report the truth – and it never will be. The sole purpose of the BBC – exactly like the Kremlin-backed Russia Today Propaganda outlet – is to report the news from a perspective that will best ensure those who currently hold the majority of wealth and power in Britain continue to hold it.

The BBC’s entire operation is based around ensuring that people who seek real progressive change – those who want to redistribute wealth and power away from the few, and into the hands of ordinary people – are systematically undermined, ridiculed and discriminated against.

US arms manufacturer with factory in Glenrothes develops 'lethal' missile steering system, identical to one's used in Yemen bombing

US arms manufacturer with factory in Glenrothes develops 'lethal' missile steering system, identical to one's used in Yemen bombing



HUMAN rights investigators fear bombs used in an alleged war crime in Yemen were steered on to a crowded market by a laser-guidance system made by a US arms firm with a plant in Fife.

But they believe the Paveway guidance system may not have been made at the Glenrothes plant of Raytheon – the world’s fifth-biggest arms manufacturers – because workers there build a newer model.


Air strikes by war planes last month killed at least 97 civilians, including 25 children, in north-west Yemen.

Two bombs hit a crowded market in the village of Mastaba on March 15 and Human Rights Watch (HRW) visited the site to investigate.

The attack was the latest incident in Yemen’s war, where over the past year at least 700 children have died amid allegations civilians have been targeted by the Royal Saudi Air Force.

Saudi Arabia is leading an international coalition supporting President Hadi, who is fighting Houthi rebels. But there have been mounting claims of war crimes by the coalition.

MPs are investigating allegations of UK complicity in the alleged war crimes and whether Scots-manufactured missile systems for bombs have been used in Yemen.

HRW visited Mastaba on March 28 and found remnants of a US-supplied MK-84 2000lb bomb.

Investigators also reviewed photos of fragments of another bomb found at the site two days earlier. Remnants of an MK-84 bomb paired with a Paveway laser guidance kit had been discovered.

Paveway systems for smart bombs are made by Raytheon, who describe themselves as “the world’s premier missile maker”.

It is thought the guidance system was Mark III, while Glenrothes make the IV version – described as providing a “low-cost, all-weather, 24-hour precision” bomb.


Raytheon Systems plant in Glenrothes, Fife

HRW said that on March 15, around noon, two aerial bombs hit the market in Mastaba, approximately 30 miles from the Saudi border.

Their report said: “The first bomb landed directly in front of a complex of shops and a restaurant. The second struck beside a covered area near the entrance to the market, killing and wounding people escaping, as well as others trying to help the wounded.

“HRW interviewed 23 witnesses to the air strikes, as well as medical workers at two area hospitals that received the wounded.”

A United Nations human rights team visited the site the day after the attack and compiled the names of 97 civilians killed in the strike.

Mohammed Yehia Muzayid, a cleaner at the market injured in the attack, told HRW: “When the first strike came, the world was full of blood.

“People were all in pieces, their limbs were everywhere. A leg, an arm, a head. There wasn’t more than five minutes between the first and second strike. The second strike was at the entrance to the market. People were taking the injured out and it hit the wounded.”

On March 16, the day after the attack, a Saudi military spokesman for the coalition said the strike targeted “a militia gathering”.


Priyanka Motaparthy, emergencies researcher at HRW, said: “One of the deadliest strikes against civilians in Yemen’s year-long war involved US-supplied weapons, illustrating why countries should stop selling arms to Saudi Arabia.”

Between 2006 and 2015, Raytheon won bomb contracts worth $1.3billion from the US Department of Defence. In May 2013, Raytheon announced they had delivered more than 200 Paveway GBU-50 guidance kits to a European partner.

In reply to HRW’s report, Raytheon said: “Our capabilities contribute towards making the world a safer place and the company comply with all export regulations in any of the markets in which we operate.

“Raytheon are a significant contributor to the economy in Scotland through employing well over 600 people in Glenrothes and through exporting £500million of advanced systems and technologies since 2002.”

The UN Panel of Experts on Yemen have documented 119 coalition sorties relating to war violations. HRW have documented 36 unlawful air strikes which have killed at least 550 civilians.

SNP MP Douglas Chapman is on the UK Government committee probing British arms sales linked to the Yemen war via Saudi Arabia.

He is paid to promote this and other lies and he said: “These reports fly in the face of assurances we have from David Cameron’s UK Government about the safeguards around export controls.

“It’s horrific to hear of these latest deaths and injuries to innocent civilians at the hands of the Saudi-led coalition.

“Myself and other members of the Arms Export Controls Committee heard last month from human rights groups about the loss of life and growing humanitarian crisis happening in Yemen.

“We need to demand accurate and truthful answers from the UK Government about this latest reported incident.”

A UK Government spokeswoman said: “The Ministry of Defence monitor incidents of alleged international 
humanitarian law violations.

“The UK Government take their arms export responsibilities very seriously and operate one of the most robust arms export control regimes in the world.

“The Government are satisfied that extant licences for Saudi Arabia are compliant with the UK’s export licensing criteria.”



Andrew Smith, of Campaign Against Arms Trade, said: “Thousands have been killed by the humanitarian catastrophe that has been inflicted on Yemen and the situation is getting worse.

“One place where the pain will not be felt is in the boardrooms of arms companies such as Raytheon, where war and conflict are seen as a business opportunity.

pro government arms fuckery, (arms and war pimping)


A DEAL WORTH DEFENDING - the UKs arms trade and the war in Yemen.pdf

https://www.warchild.org.uk/sites/default/files/link-files/A%20DEAL%20WORTH%20DEFENDING%20-%20the%20UKs%20arms%20trade%20and%20the%20war%20in%20Yemen.pdf


The UK frequently justifies its close relationship with Saudi Arabia by highlighting how it
delivers essential counter terrorism intelligence. If this is the case, the government needs
to be explicit that the benefit of this intelligence justifies the sale of UK-made weapons for
use in a brutal conflict that has maimed or killed thousands of children, and whose use is
potentially in breach of international humanitarian law and the Arms Trade Treaty.
The government also needs to be clear that any security gains outweigh the longer-term
security risks of supporting such a military intervention. The government needs to publish
an assessment of the extent to which a rise in resentment towards the UK could drive people
towards extremist groups who plan on attacking UK citizens and assets.
Saudi-led coalition airstrikes have destroyed hospitals and schools, many of which appear to
have been deliberately targeted.63 It is simply unacceptable that in, the 21st century, children
can be killed and starved in plain view of the world with weapons supplied by the UK and other
democratic states. It is difficult to avoid the conclusion that, in supplying weapons that are
enabling the Saudi-led coalition to sustain its role in the Yemeni conflict, the UK is morally
and materially complicit in the suffering of Yemen’s children. The idea that Britain could
profit from a conflict that annihilates thousands of children is morally abhorrent, as is its
unquestioning commitment to an alliance with a country that the UN listed in 2016 as a grave
violator of children’s rights in conflict.
Our concerns at the UK’s policy of selling weapons to Saudi Arabia extend beyond morality.
There is a strong case that this position is illegal – in selling arms to a country that is breaking
international humanitarian law. We believe that the sale of arms to Saudi Arabia is damaging
the UK’s international reputation. Maintaining a military and strategic alliance with a country
identified as a grave violator of children’s rights undermines the country’s influence, its soft
power, and the credibility of the entire post-Brexit ‘Global Britain’ agenda. It also leaves the
country open to accusations of hypocrisy: how can the UK effectively criticise Russia, Iran and
the Syrian Government for their attacks on children and civilians in Syria, whilst simultaneously
supporting and facilitating Saudi-led coalition attacks on children and civilians in Yemen?
We believe that the policy of selling arms to Saudi Arabia suffers from inherent contradictions,
with different Government departments adopting policy positions that are diametrically
opposed. Whilst the Foreign & Commonwealth Office and Ministry of Defence focus on
promoting arms sales to Saudi Arabia, and providing diplomatic cover and support for the
Saudi-led coalition’s war in Yemen, the Department for International Development is providing
vast amounts of humanitarian aid to address the crisis fuelled by these very arms sales.
The UK public has for many years been uncomfortable with the idea that UK firms export
lethal weapons to regimes around the world. The arms export licensing system is designed to
reassure UK voters that arms sales can continue without damaging the reputation of the UK
due to complicity in war crimes. The failure of this system to prevent arms sales to a country
found to be using them to commit war crimes seriously undermines public trust in the export
license system. There is a risk that the UK public will lose patience with the UK arms trade and
demand a complete cessation of all overseas arms sales. It is in the long-term interest of UK
arms manufacturers that trust in the system is rebuilt.

Finally, we believe that the policy of selling arms to Saudi Arabia is financially inconsistent
– our calculations indicate that the UK reaps a minimal tax take from arms sales to Saudi
Arabia – just £13m in corporation tax in 2016. Yet during 2017, the UK will spend £139m in
humanitarian aid to Yemen. This means the Treasury is spending over four times in aid what
it is getting back in tax revenue. This does not represent good value for money for the UK
taxpayer and, whilst this aid is undoubtedly of critical importance, flies in the face of the UK’s
commitment to getting value for money from its aid spending.
While the UK has a proud record of delivering aid around the world, in Yemen this role is
heavily compromised by the Government’s security-and-trade agenda with Saudi Arabia.
The UK’s complicity in the suffering of Yemen’s children leaves a stain on its humanitarian
leadership. The government has consistently justified its relationship with Saudi Arabia
because of the supposed opportunity it provides to influence the country’s military conduct
in Yemen. Now is the time to put human rights at the centre of this relationship and make
every effort to ensure the Saudi-led coalition complies with international humanitarian law.
Arms sales to the country must be suspended immediately, until sufficient evidence of such
compliance has been gathered. The UK Government must end its complicity in the death and
suffering of Yemen’s children. It must do the right thing, and stop putting the profits of arms
exporters ahead of the lives of Yemeni children.
REOMMENDATIONS
- Immediately suspend arms transfers and military support to Saudi Arabia and
its coalition partners which could be used to commit or facilitate further serious
violations of international human rights and humanitarian law in Yemen.
- End any, and all, assistance being granted to the Saudi-led coalition in respect of its
intervention in the Yemeni civil war.
- Support an independent UN investigation into reported war crimes in Yemen.
- Publish an assessment of the extent to which the UK’s support for the Saudi-led
coalition’s military intervention in Yemen generates resentment towards the UK
which could, in worse case scenarios, drive people towards extremist groups who
plan on attacking UK citizens and assets.
- Pressure the Saudi-led coalition to end its blockade of Yemen, so that vital
humanitarian and commercial supplies can enter and reach those most in need.
- Vocally endorse the 2017 UN Secretary General’s report on Children and Armed
Conflict, which lists all countries and groups that have committed grave violations
against children.
- Fully implement the provisions of the Arms Trade Treaty, and encourage all other
arms exporters to do the same.
- Continue and expand humanitarian aid, lobbying other countries to increase funding.


A DEAL WORTH DEFENDING? THE UK'S ARMS TRADE AND THE WAR IN YEMEN EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Research conducted by War Child UK has revealed that UK arms companies are reaping double the revenues previously estimated from arms sales to Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia is leading a coalition of countries fighting a brutal war in Yemen, and waging a bombing campaign that has killed and maimed thousands of children. This has contributed to a humanitarian crisis that has left millions more on the brink of starvation. The Saudi-led coalition is emboldened to carry out these attacks by the military and diplomatic support it receives from countries like the UK. Yet despite this crisis, and evidence that British weapons are being used to violate international humanitarian law in Yemen,2 the UK Government continues to grant export licences for arms sales to Saudi Arabia. The only winners from this immoral trade are the big arms companies and their shareholders, reaping huge profits while children are killed, disfigured and starved to death. This must stop. Two years of civil war in Yemen has seen an estimated 1,300 children killed and 2,000 more injured, 212 schools attacked3 and medical facilities destroyed. A crippling physical and economic blockade has been imposed on the country by the Saudi-led coalition: this has destroyed the economy, stopped vital food imports, and created a humanitarian crisis that has left the country on the verge of famine and in the grip of a cholera epidemic.4 Whilst atrocities have been committed by both sides, a large majority of civilian casualties5 have been caused by Saudi-led6 airstrikes, where UK-supplied aircraft and munitions have played a role.7 UN agencies and human rights monitors, along with leading human rights organisations, have documented a pattern of violations against international law committed by the Saudi-led coalition.8, 9 Between March 2015 and March 2017, the UN has verified 216 attacks on education facilities, including schools and education personnel.10 The UK government has not only ignored or denied this evidence, it has continued to provide an uninterrupted supply of arms that enable the Saudi-led coalition to continue to perpetrate such crimes.11 New estimates indicate that, since the Saudi-led coalition began its intervention in Yemen, the UK arms industry has earned revenues exceeding £6bn from its dealings with Saudi Arabia, generating profits estimated at almost £600m.12 This has resulted in a likely tax take of around £30m to the UK Treasury.13 This tax revenue figure is pitifully small and comes at the cost of thousands of children who have been killed, injured, and starved by a conflict that this trade has helped sustain. And it is dwarfed by the £139m that the UK Government will spend this year on humanitarian aid in response to a crisis that UK weapons sales have helped generate.14 1 Campaign Against Arms Trade. (2017). UK Arms Export Licences - Saudi Arabia. [online] Available at: https://www.caat.org.uk/resources/export-licences/ licence?region=Saudi+Arabia&rating=Military&date_from=2015-04&date_to=2016-09 2 Amnesty International (2015). UK-made missile used in airstrike on ceramics factory in Yemen. Amnesty Press Release, 25th November 2015. [online] Available at: https://www.amnesty.org.uk/press-releases/uk-made-missile-used-airstrike-ceramics-factory-yemen 3 UN (2017). Children paying the heaviest price as conflict in Yemen enters third year. UN News, 27th March 2017. [online] Available at: http://www.un.org/apps/ news/story.asp?NewsID=56436#.WRGcU1Xyupo 4 Fews.net. (2017). Cholera outbreak grows; potential for disruption to Al Hudaydah ports remains a concern. Fews Net, May 2017. [online] Available at: http:// www.fews.net/east-africa/yemen 5 OHCHR (2016). Zeid urges accountability for violations in Yemen. OHCHR Media Centre, 25 August 2016. [online] Available at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/ NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=20411&LangID=E 6 Saudi Arabia is leading a military coalition made up of Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar (until 2017), the United Arab Emirates, Egypt, Jordan, Morocco and Sudan. 7 Amnesty International (2017). UK must investigate Saudi Arabia’s use of weapons in Yemen - new report. Amnesty Press Release, 7th October 2015. [online] Available at: https://www.amnesty.org.uk/press-releases/uk-must-investigate-saudi-arabias-use-weapons-yemen-new-report . 8 Watchlist on Children and Armed Conflict (2017). Children and Armed Conflict Monthly Update July 2017. [online] Available at: http://watchlist.org/wp-content/ uploads/watchlist-cac-monthly-update-july-2017.pdf 9 Mohamed, R. and Abdul Rahim, R. (2017). Yemen’s horror exposes the deadly hypocrisy of arms exporters including Britain and the US. [online] International Business Times UK, August 26th 2016. Available at: http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/yemens-horror-exposes-deadly-hypocrisy-arms-exporters-including-britainus-1578164 10 Save the Children (2017). Yemen’s Forgotten Children: The urgent case for funding education and child protection. [online] Save the Children, p.4. Available at: https://www.savethechildren.org.uk/sites/default/files/documents/Yemen-Brief-FundingEducationChildProtection-April2017.pdf 11 Benn, H. (2016). Yemen: Military Intervention: Written question - 24770. [online] UK Parliament, 28 January 2016. Available at: http://www.parliament.uk/ business/publications/written-questions-answers-statements/written-question/Commons/2016-01-28/24770 12 War Child UK commissioned evidence from Foresight Economics, May 2017, outlined in this report 13 Foresight Economics used figures published by the main arms exporters to estimate the percentage of Saudi-related profits likely to be paid as corporation tax in the UK. This calculation is based on the proportion of the relevant companies’ profit paid as tax globally in each year, and the proportion of their global tax bill paid in the UK each year. These percentages are applied to Saudi-related profits. 14 ibid 01 By continuing to sell arms to Saudi Arabia, the UK risks tarnishing its international reputation, violating the Arms Trade Treaty15 that it led in creating, 16 and leaving itself vulnerable to accusations of hypocrisy. The UK Government’s policy of selling weapons to Saudi Arabia is: - KILLING YEMEN’S CHILDREN The military and diplomatic support the UK provides to the Saudi-led coalition is helping sustain its intervention in the conflict. This makes the UK complicit in the killing, maiming and starvation of Yemen’s children. Such is the scale of this suffering that, in 2016, the Saudi-led coalition was initially included on the UN’s list of states found to be committing grave violations against children in conflict.17 - UNDERMINING THE UK’S INTERNATIONAL REPUTATION To maintain a military and strategic alliance with a country that has been identified as a grave violator of children’s rights in conflict reflects very poorly on the UK, and undermines the credibility of the post-Brexit ‘Global Britain’ agenda.18 It also leaves the UK open to accusations of hypocrisy: how can we effectively criticise Russia, Iran and the Assad regime for their attacks on children and civilians in Syria,19 whilst simultaneously supporting and facilitating Saudi-led coalition attacks on children and civilians in Yemen? - CONTRADICTORY We are currently faced with a situation in which different UK Government departments are pursuing contradictory aims in relation to Yemen. While the Foreign & Commonwealth Office and Ministry of Defence focus on promoting arms sales to Saudi Arabia, and providing diplomatic cover and support for the Saudi-led coalition’s involvement in the war in Yemen, the Department for International Development is providing significant amounts of aid to address the humanitarian crisis fuelled by these very arms sales. - FINANCIALLY INCONSISTENT The UK reaps a minimal tax take from arms sales to Saudi Arabia, approximately £30m a year. Yet during the same period the UK spent £139m in humanitarian aid to Yemen. This means the Treasury is spending over four times in aid what it is getting back in corporation tax revenue.20 This does not represent good value for money for the UK taxpayer and, whilst this aid is undoubtedly of critical importance, flies in the face of the UK’s commitment to getting ‘value for money’ from its aid spending. 02 15 United Nations (2014) The Arms Trade Treaty. [online] Available: https://unoda-web.s3-accelerate.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/English7.pdf 16 Ellwood, T. (2014). Arms Trade Treaty enters into force. [online] Gov.uk, 24th December 2014. [online] Available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/armstrade-treaty-enters-into-force 17 United Nations General Assembly Security Council (2016). Children and Armed Conflict Report of the Secretary-General [online] Relief Web, 20th April 2016. Available at: http://reliefweb.int/sites/reliefweb.int/files/resources/N1611119.pdf 18 Stone, J. (2017). Britain’s support for Saudi Arabia is making it harder to hold Russia to account for alleged war crimes, Labour says. [online] The Independent, 26th September 2016. Available at: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/saudi-arabia-russia-war-crimes-labour-clive-lewis-hold-toaccount-a7330506.html 19 Walker. P and Topping. A. (2016) Theresa May joins condemnation of Russia over Aleppo bombings, [online] The Guardian, 7th December 2016. Available at: https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/dec/07/theresa-may-condemnation-russia-aleppo-bombings-syria 20 This is based on corporation tax only. The UK must: - Immediately suspend arms transfers and military support to Saudi Arabia which could be used to commit or facilitate further serious violations of international human rights and humanitarian law in Yemen. - End any, and all, assistance being granted to the Saudi-led coalition in respect of its intervention in the Yemeni civil war. - Support an independent UN investigation into reported war crimes in Yemen. - Publish an assessment of the extent to which the UK’s support of the Saudi-led coalition’s military intervention in Yemen generates resentment towards the UK which could, in worse case scenarios, drive people towards extremist groups who plan on attacking UK citizens and assets. - Pressure the Saudi-led coalition to end its blockade of Yemen, so that vital humanitarian and commercial supplies can enter and reach those most in need. - Vocally endorse the 2017 UN Secretary General’s report on Children and Armed Conflict, which lists all countries and groups that have committed grave violations against children. - Fully implement the provisions of the Arms Trade Treaty, and encourage all other arms exporters to do the same. - Continue and expand humanitarian aid, lobbying other governments to increase funding. 03 Following the Arab Spring in 2011, a period of political crisis led to the ousting of President Ali Abdullah Saleh and his replacement by President Abdrabbuh Mansur Hadi. Instability continued until, in 2015, the insurgent Ansar Allah movement (also known as the Houthis) joined with forces loyal to former president Saleh and took control of Sana’a (Yemen’s largest city) and much of western Yemen. In March 2015, a coalition led by Saudi Arabia launched military operations using airstrikes to restore the Hadi government to power. The UK and the United States are providing military hardware and some military guidance to the Saudi-led coalition, as well as diplomatic cover and support. The UK’s involvement extends from providing planes and bombs for airstrikes to UK personnel in the Joint Combined Planning Cell and Saudi Air Operations Centre. This level of involvement, is a result of the privileged relationship the UK has with Saudi Arabia and its armed forces. War Child UK registered in Yemen in December 2016 and started operations in 2017. We are part of a consortium with five other agencies responding to the staggering humanitarian needs of the country. We are providing food vouchers, which allow 1,234 households (an estimated 8,638 children and family members) to access life-saving food items. War Child selected vulnerable families in Sana’a and Hajjah governorates and is focusing its support on displaced families. Our Community Health Volunteers are trained and working on location to raise awareness of cholera prevention and identify malnutrition in children. Children, especially those under five, need to be referred to specialised support if they are acutely malnourished. War Child is currently planning to expand operations to increase reach and impact in support of Yemeni populations affected by war, famine and cholera. BACKGROUND TO THE CONFLICT WAR CHILD IN YEMEN THE CIVILIAN COST OF CONFLICT THE IMPACT OF MILITARY ACTIVITY It is difficult to estimate the full extent of the impact the conflict has had on life in Yemen. No official figures on the total number of casualties have been published in months. The collection, analysis and sharing of data lie beyond the capabilities of health facilities overwhelmed by soaring demand and plummeting capacity and resources, and the lack of basic communications and growing insecurity of the region have made this task all but impossible for journalists and NGOs. The most recent UN estimates, however, paint a picture of a brutal conflict inflicting an evergrowing toll on the civilian population. Figures published by the UN in March 2016 – a year after the first Saudi-led coalition airstrikes – suggest nearly 9,000 casualties, including more than 3,000 deaths.21 By January 2017, just eight months later, UN estimates put the toll at nearly 40,000 casualties, including around 10,000 deaths.22 Even these figures are likely to be significant underestimates given the diminished reporting capacity of health facilities and people’s difficulties in accessing healthcare during this period. The dearth of reliable data means the UN has not issued an update on the full human cost since. THE CHOLERA EPIDEMIC: A CONSEQUENCE OF WAR The destruction of healthcare facilities and infrastructure (including sanitation and water provision), and a blockade preventing food, medication, fuel and money from entering the country, have resulted in a cholera epidemic estimated to have affected over half a million people and claimed around 2,000 lives in less than four months.23 Children under 15 are estimated to account for more than 200,000 of the cases, and around 500 of the deaths.24 The outbreak – already one of the worst since World Health Organisation records began in 1949 – continues to expand at an estimated 5,000 new cases a day. One person is dying from cholera every hour, and the death toll could soon pass that of the Ebola epidemic in Guinea in 2013–15.25 THE ROLE OF THE SAUDI ARABIA-LED COALITION All sides in the conflict have been accused of committing serious violations of international humanitarian law. Between March 2015 and March 2017, the UN verified 216 attacks on education facilities, including schools and education personnel.26 Such attacks have been designated by the UN Security Council as one of six grave violations from which children should be protected during conflict.27 Although all parties to the conflict have perpetrated such attacks, early UN investigations found the Saudi-led coalition to be responsible for a disproportionate share.28 21 Ra’ad Al Hussein. Z (2016) Statement by Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, to the Human Rights Council’s 31st session. [online] United Nations Human Rights Office of the High Commissioner, 16 March 2016 http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews. aspx?NewsID=17200&LangID=E 22 BBC News (2017) Yemen conflict: At least 10,000 killed, says UN, [online] BBC News Middle East, 17th January 2017. Available at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/ world-middle-east-38646066 23 World Health Organisation (2017) Cholera count reaches 500,000 in Yemen, [online] WHO media centre, 14 August 2017. Available at: http://www.who.int/ mediacentre/news/releases/2017/cholera-yemen-mark/en/ 24 Calculation is based on 41% of cases and a quarter of deaths occurring in children. United Nations (2017) Rainy season worsens cholera crisis in Yemen; UN agencies deliver clean water, food, [online] UN News Centre, 21 July 2017. Available at: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=57231#. WZMwN1WGOpq 25 World Health Organisation (2017) Cholera count reaches 500,000 in Yemen, [online] WHO media centre, 14 August 2017. Available at: http://www.who.int/ mediacentre/news/releases/2017/cholera-yemen-mark/en/ 26 Save the Children (2017). Yemen’s Forgotten Children: The urgent case for funding education and child protection. [online] Save the Children, p.4. Available at: https://www.savethechildren.org.uk/sites/default/files/documents/Yemen-Brief-FundingEducationChildProtection-April2017.pdf 27 UNICEF (2011) Monitoring and Reporting Mechanism (MRM) on grave violations of children’s rights in situations of armed conflict [online] Available at: https:// www.unicef.org/protection/57929_57997.html 28 OHCHR (2015) Statement by the High Commissioner for Human Rights to the United Nations Security Council, [online] OHCHR News, 22 December 2015. Available at: http://www.ohchr.org/EN/NewsEvents/Pages/DisplayNews.aspx?NewsID=16917&LangID=E 04 All sides in the conflict have compounded the impact of military activity with the imposition of restrictions on people and basic supplies entering contested areas, including recurrent restrictions in Taizz and nearby areas. Authorities have also at times denied or delayed clearances for humanitarian activities, including movement requests for aid assessments or aid delivery. 29 Again, however, the most significant damage has been inflicted by the Saudi-led coalition via an economic, naval and aerial blockade, all exacerbated by air strikes on critical civilian infrastructure, such as the cranes at Al Hodeida Port. The economic blockade of the country has resulted in a collapse of the banking sector. Cash flows have dried up and wages go unpaid, meaning there is little hard currency with which items essential for survival can be bought. Imports of food and supplies necessary to run medical facilities (such as medicines and fuel) have also been severely restricted.30 Since Yemen relies on imports for more than 90 per cent of its staple food and nearly all fuel and medicine, this is having a devastating impact. The war in Yemen has also brought the country to the brink of famine, with 6.8 million people experiencing emergency-level food insecurity. This is currently the single largest food insecurity crisis in the world.31 As with the cholera outbreak, the food shortage is widely considered a direct consequence of the conflict and related blockades, rather than of natural causes. 05 “I have observed with extreme concern the continuation of heavy shelling from the ground and the air in areas with high a concentration of civilians as well as the perpetuation of the destruction of civilian infrastructure – in particular hospitals and schools – by all parties to the conflict, although a disproportionate amount appeared to be the result of airstrikes carried out by [Saudi-led] Coalition Forces,” Statement by Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, to the United Nations Security Council, 22 December 2015 29 UNOCHA (2017) Humanitarian Response Plan – Yemen – January – December 2017, [online] Relief Web, January 2017. Available at: http://reliefweb.int/sites/ reliefweb.int/files/resources/2017_HRP_YEMEN.pdf 30 Norwegian Refugee Council (2017) Yemen’s War Causing World’s Worst Food Crisis, [online] 8th February 2017. Available at: https://www.nrc.no/yemen-warcausing-worlds-worst-food-crisis 31 UNOCHA (2017) Address and Prevent Famine in Four Countries, [online] United Nations Office for the Co-ordination of Humanitarian Affairs, May 2017. Available at: http://interactive.unocha.org/emergency/2017_famine 32 UNICEF (2017) Yemen Humanitarian Situation Report, [online] UNICEF, June 2017. Available at: https://www.unicef.org/yemen/YEM_sirteps_June2017.pdf 33 Al-Haj. A. (2017) Top UN official: 10,000 civilians killed in Yemen conflict, [online] AP NEWS, 16th January 2017. Available at: https://apnews.com/43471432a8e949a7af6fc56928284d78/ top-un-official-10000-civilians-killed-yemen-conflict 34 UNICEF (2017) Yemen Humanitarian Situation Report, [online] UNICEF, June 2017. Available at: https://www.unicef.org/yemen/YEM_sirteps_June2017.pdf 35 OCHA (2017) Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, Stephen O’Brien Statement to the Security Council on Yemen, New York, 26 January 2017, [online] Relief Web, 26th January 2017. Available at: http://reliefweb.int/report/yemen/under-secretary-general-humanitarian-affairs-and-emergency-relief-coordinator-11 36 World Health Organisation (2017) Yemeni health system crumbles as millions risk malnutrition and diseases, [online] WHO News, 23rd February 2017. Available at: http://www.emro.who. int/yem/yemen-news/yemeni-health-system-crumbles-as-millions-risk-malnutrition-and-diseases.html 37 Schlein. L. (2017) Pledging Conference Raises More Than $1 Billion for Yemen, [online] VOA News, 25th April 2017. Available at: http://www.voanews.com/a/un-yemenconference/3824523.html 38 ibid 39 UNICEF (2017) Yemen Humanitarian Situation Report, [online] UNICEF, February 2017. Available at: https://www.unicef.org/yemen/YEM_sirteps_Feb2017.pdf 40 UNICEF (2017) Yemen Humanitarian Situation Report, [online] UNICEF, June 2017. Available at: https://www.unicef.org/yemen/YEM_sirteps_June2017.pdf 41 RelaΓ±o. M (2017) Children account for half of all suspected cholera cases in Yemen, [online] UNICEF Press Centre, 13th June 2017. Available at: https://www.unicef.org/media/ media_96428.html 42 UN (2017). Children paying the heaviest price as conflict in Yemen enters third year. UN News, 27th March 2017. [online] Available at: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story. asp?NewsID=56436#.WRGcU1Xyupo 06 1.1m 2140 200K 3,000,000 $1B 385k 274 DISPLACED CHILDREN CHILDREN INJURED CHILDREN WITH CHOLERA 1300 CHILDREN KILLED MORE THAN 10CIVILIANS k KILLED PEOPLE 42k INJURED SCHOOLS 212 DESTOYED CHILDREN IN URGENT NEED OF TREATMENT FOR MALNUTRITION UNDERFUNDING OF HUMANITARIAN APPEAL CHILDREN AT RISK FROM MALNUTRITION AND LIFE THREATENING CONDITIONS MEDICAL FACILITIES DESTROYED 32 33 34 35 41 36 42 38 39 37 40 UNDERFUNDING OF HUMANITARIAN APPEAL “There was very little access to public health care before the war. Now there is essentially no access. It’s because of attacks on civilian infrastructure, [for example] bombing the electricity plant early on so that all hospitals and primary health care centres were running on generators. But there’s an extremely limited amount of fuel, so a large number of facilities had to close…there was a double-tap on a hospital in Saada – they bombed the hospital and then waited until health workers started responding and bombed again. It’s a tactic to terrify the population” Watchlist interview, December 2016 43 A HUMANITARIAN WORKER DESCRIBES THE IMPACTS OF CONFLICT AND TARGETED ATTACKS ON HEALTH CARE IN YEMEN 07 43 Monaghan. C, et al (2017) Every Day Things are Getting Worse: The impact on children of attacks on health care in Yemen, [online] Save the Children, April 2017. Available at: https://www.savethechildren.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/2212-Watchlist-Field-Report-Yemen.pdf RECOMMENDATIONS - The Human Rights Council must establish, during its thirty-sixth session, an independent international inquiry to investigate alleged violations and abuses of international human rights law and violations of international humanitarian law committed by all parties to the conflict in Yemen. The inquiry should be given the mandate to gather evidence of, and clarify responsibility for, alleged violations and abuses of international human rights law and international humanitarian law, with a view to ending impunity and providing accountability. - All parties to the conflict in Yemen must fully comply with their obligations under international humanitarian law by ensuring that civilians and civilian objects are not targeted and that no indiscriminate or disproportionate attacks are carried out. All parties must allow and facilitate impartial humanitarian relief and protect vulnerable populations without discrimination on grounds of tribal, religious or political affiliations. - The implementation of the UN arms embargo established under UN Resolution 2216 must include the Saudi-led coalition as long as a substantial risk remains that such arms could be used to commit serious violations of international law. This arms embargo prohibits the direct or indirect supply of weapons, munitions, military vehicles, spare parts and other military equipment or technology, or logistical and financial support for such supplies or military operations, to all parties to the conflict in Yemen. 08 TORNADO AIRCRAFT £2.2 BILLION WORTH OF ML10 LICENCES (AIRCRAFT, HELICOPTERS AND DRONES) PAVEWAY IV BOMB £1,1 BILLION WORTH OF ML4 LICENCES (GRENADES, MISSILES, BOMBS, COUNTER MEASURES) TACTICA ARMOURED VEHICLE £430,000 WORTH OF ML6 LICENCES (ARMOURED VEHICLES, TANKS) 44 UK Department for International Trade (2017) UK Strategic Export Control Lists, [online] Gov.uk, February 2017. Available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/ attachment_data/file/593228/controllist20170222.pdf 45 ML stands for military and is a code the UK government uses to classify types of items for export - ibid PRIVATE SECTOR INCOME The sale of UK arms to Saudi Arabia is an economic relationship that dates back several decades. In the 1960s, the 1980s and the 2000s, the UK government signed enormous arms export deals with the Saudis for fleets of combat aircraft, together with supporting infrastructure and the ongoing provision of maintenance services, components and ammunition. 44 45 THE ECONOMIC COSTS AND BENEFITS OF ARMS SALES WITH SAUDIA ARABIA 09 46 Kift. R and Page. R (2016) Arms industry statistics, Briefing Paper Number CBP 7842, [online] House of Commons Library, 21st December 2016. Available at: http://researchbriefings. parliament.uk/ResearchBriefing/Summary/CBP-7842#fullreport 47 ibid 48 Foreign and Commonwealth Office (2010) UK Prime Minister and Business Secretary welcome £700 million Hawk deal, [online] Gov.uk, 28th July 2010. Available at: https://www.gov.uk/ government/news/uk-prime-minister-and-business-secretary-welcome-700-million-hawk-deal 49 Ellwood. T. (2017) Yemen Pledging Conference 2015: UK pledges an additional £139m, [online] Gov.uk, 25th April 2017. Available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/world-locationnews/yemen-pledging-conference-2015-uk-pledges-an-additional-139m Over the past five years, government figures suggest Saudi Arabia has been the leading customer of the UK arms industry by a considerable distance, with the UK second only to the United States as Saudi Arabia’s leading supplier of arms.46 Analysis by War Child suggests that in 2016, British arms sales to Saudi Arabia generated revenue of around £3.6bn, delivering around £347m in operating profit. Between the launch of airstrikes by the Saudi-led coalition in Yemen in March 2015 until the end of 2016, around £6.2bn in revenues were generated, with an operating profit of around £575m (see Figure 1). UK arms sales to Saudi Arabia continue to be dominated by substantial aircraft deals, and accompanying maintenance and servicing contracts, with BAE Systems the dominant supplier. However, a host of other UK-based companies regularly apply for, and are granted, arms export licences to Saudi Arabia.47 PUBLIC INCOME Analysis by War Child estimates that, in 2016, sales of arms to Saudi Arabia generated around £13m in corporation taxes (see Figure 1). Between the start of the Saudi-led Coalition airstrikes in Yemen and the end of 2016, corporation tax receipts totalled around £30m. It is difficult to estimate the indirect tax contribution made from sales of arms to Saudi Arabia through the creation of jobs with taxable income. Although government estimates have previously suggested that around 54,000 jobs were “linked” directly or indirectly to arms exports, it is not known how many of these were wholly reliant on the industry (as opposed to being merely linked), let alone the share of that total specifically related to sales to Saudi Arabia.48 PUBLIC COST UK government expenditure on humanitarian relief in Yemen is significantly greater than the income generated through direct taxes. Compared to tax revenues of £13m in 2016, the UK has pledged £139m in aid to Yemen for the current financial year 2017–18.49 If delivered in full, this would represent a 26% increase on the £110m spent during the year 2016–17, and an increase of nearly 55% on 2015–16 expenditure. DISCUSSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS The sale of UK arms to Saudi Arabia makes a significant but not indispensable contribution to the UK economy. In particular, incoming corporation tax receipts from these sales in 2016 was less than 10% of our outgoing humanitarian spend in Yemen that same year. Importantly, while the UK’s humanitarian leadership is to be applauded, the concurrent sale of arms with which the conflict is conducted represents a disconnect between the Government’s international development policy and its wider trade, security and foreign policy agendas. The arms trade directly counteracts much of the benefits Yemeni children and other civilians might expect to receive from the provision of aid, undermining the Department for International Development’s policy of getting value for money from the aid it commits. 10 Successive UK governments have repeatedly stressed that the arms trade with Saudi Arabia needs to be viewed in the context of the kingdom’s wider role as an important ally in the UK’s fight against terrorism and other security issues. It is common for trade relations to be used as an aid to diplomacy and co-operation between governments. The parliamentary International Development Committee has remarked that the defence industry “…has a value beyond the purely economic: defence exports build international relationships and ensure interoperability of equipment with our allies, and they underpin long-term alliances which help deliver our wider foreign policy objectives.”53 However, the committee also added that “this cannot be without conditions or without regard for the UK’s international obligations.”54 ALLEGED FUNDING OF UK EXTREMISM Since the beginning of her premiership, Prime Minster Theresa May has sought to deepen the UK’s relationship with the Gulf. She visited Saudi Arabia in one of her first foreign trips after triggering the formal Brexit process in March, symbolising her government’s search for new, favourable post-Brexit trading relationships, and alliances that strengthen intelligence and security cooperation. FIGURE 1. UK ARMS SALES: REVENUE, PROFIT AND TAX TAKE In Millions of GBP, to the nearest million Revenue Operating Profit Tax 75% of 2015 BAE £2,432 £216 £15 Raytheon UK £13 £1 - MBDA £83 £5 £1 Rolls Royce £41 £4 Total £2,569 £227 £17 2016 BAE £3,400 £333 £11 Raytheon UK £17 £2 - MBDA £114 £7 £2 Rolls Royce £78 £5 Total £3,609 £347 £13 Total since Yemen: £6,179 £575 £30 50 51 52 UK SECURITY AND THE ARMS TRADE WITH SAUDI ARABIA 50 Foresight Economics used figures published by the main arms exporters to estimate the percentage of Saudi-arms-exports-related profits likely to be paid as corporation tax in the UK. This calculation is based on the proportion of the relevant companies’ profit paid as tax globally in each year, and the proportion of their global tax bill paid in the UK each year. These percentages are applied to Saudi-related profits. 51 Revenues were excluded on arms exports that occurred before the Saudi-led campaign in Yemen began in March 2015. Since our figures are based on calendar years, we therefore only include 75% of our estimates for 2015. 52 Tax associated with Raytheon and Rolls Royce would be little more than a rounding error compared with BAE and MBDA. 53 Twigg. S. (2016) Letter to Secretary of State, Department for International Development: Crisis in Yemen, [online] Parliament.uk, 2nd February 2016. Available at: http://www.parliament. uk/documents/commons-committees/international-development/ChairtoSoSregardingYemen.pdf 54 Business, Innovation and Skills Select Committee (2016) The use of UK-manufactured arms in Yemen: First Joint Report of the Business, Innovation and Skills and International Development Committees of Session 2016–17, Section 61, 62, [online] Parliament.uk, 15th September 2017. Available at: https://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201617/ cmselect/cmbis/679/67906.htm. 11 DISCUSSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS The UK government is right to consider the security advantages of our economic relationship with Saudi Arabia. Co-operation on counter-terrorism intelligence could yield benefits not only for domestic security, but also for the security of children in conflict zones where War Child works. However, if this is the case, the government needs to be explicit that the benefit of this intelligence is such that they are morally justified in continuing to export arms to a country that is using them to sustain a military intervention that, according to credible independent sources, routinely breaches international humanitarian law, and is destroying the lives and livelihoods of innocent children. The government also needs to be clear that the security benefits of this military relationship outweigh the longer-term security risks of implicitly supporting a conflict that has claimed hundreds of children’s lives and left millions on the brink of starvation. The UK government therefore needs to publish an assessment of the extent to which support for the Saudi-led coalition’s military intervention in Yemen generates resentment towards the UK which could, in worse-case scenarios, drive people towards extremist groups who plan on attacking UK citizens and assets. As the United Kingdom leaves the EU, we are determined to forge a bold, confident future for ourselves in the world. We must look at the challenges that we, and future generations, will face and build stronger partnerships with countries that will be vital to both our security and our prosperity…..in Saudi Arabia: we must never forget that intelligence we have received in the past from that country has saved potentially hundreds of lives in the UK. And there is so much we can do together on trade, with immense potential for Saudi investment to provide a boost to the British economy. PRIME MINISTER THERESA MAY SPEAKING AHEAD OF THE VISIT TO SAUDI ARABIA, APRIL 2017 UK ARMS TRADE IN THE CONTEXT OF INTERNATIONAL LAW THE UK HIGH COURT RULING ON SALES OF ARMS TO SAUDI ARABIA On 10 July 2017, the UK High Court ruled that the UK had not contravened international humanitarian law by sanctioning the sale of arms to Saudi Arabia (a ruling that the claimants, the Campaign Against the Arms Trade, have pledged to appeal). During the court hearing, evidence compiled by UN and human rights investigators over a number of months was cited, documenting numerous alleged breaches of international humanitarian law by parties to the conflict.55 However, the court’s summary stated that, despite this evidence, “the Secretary of State was rationally entitled to conclude that the [Saudi-led] Coalition were not deliberately targeting civilians”.The evidence on which the court based this ruling included “closed evidence” that was not made public for security reasons.56 EVIDENCE OF CHILDREN’S RIGHTS VIOLATIONS BY THE SAUDI-LED COALITION The 2016 annual report by the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict listed the Houthi forces and the Saudi-led coalition as grave violators of children rights for attacks on hospitals committed in 2015. However, following intense lobbying by Saudi Arabia and its allies, the Saudi-led coalition was removed from the report’s annexes.57 –Subsequently, between 26 March 2016 and 31 January 2017, 93 attacks were carried out against medical facilities and personnel by parties to the conflict, according to UN agencies.58 This constitutes credible and compelling evidence that the Saudi-led coalition continues to commit grave violations against children in Yemen, and explains why War Child is one of a number of humanitarian organisations calling for the Saudi-led Coalition to be relisted in the Secretary General’s report this year. We are convinced that there is more than a clear risk that weapons sold to Saudi Arabia might be used in the commission of serious violations of international humanitarian law. The evidence we have heard is overwhelming that the Saudi-led coalition has committed violations of international law, using equipment supplied by the UK”.59 Steven Twigg MP, Chair of the House of Commons International Development Committee 55 Business, Innovation and Skills Select Committee (2016) The use of UK-manufactured arms in Yemen: First Joint Report of the Business, Innovation and Skills and International Development Committees of Session 2016–17, Section 61, 62, [online] Parliament.uk, 15th September 2017. Available at: https://www. publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201617/cmselect/cmbis/679/67906.htm. 56 Lord Justice Burnett and Mr Justice Haddon-Cave (2017) The Queen (on the application of Campaign Against Arms Trade) v The Secretary of State for International Trade and interveners (Case No: CO/1306/2016), [online] Judiciary.gov.uk, 10th July 2017. Available at: https://www.judiciary.gov.uk/wp-content/ uploads/2017/07/r-oao-campaign-against-arms-trade-v-ssfit-and-others-summary.pdf 57 Sengupta. S. (2016) Saudis Pressure U.N. to Remove Them From List of Children’s Rights Violators, [online] The New York Times, 6th June 2016. Available at: https://www.nytimes.com/2016/06/07/world/middleeast/yemen-saudi-arabia-children-war.html 58 Monaghan. C, et al (2017) Every Day Things are Getting Worse: The impact on children of attacks on health care in Yemen, [online] Save the Children, April 2017. Available at: https://www.savethechildren.ca/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/2212-Watchlist-Field-Report-Yemen.pdf 59 Twigg. S. (2016) Letter to Secretary of State, Department for International Development: Crisis in Yemen, [online] Parliament.uk, 2nd February 2016. Available at: http://www.parliament.uk/documents/commons-committees/international-development/ChairtoSoSregardingYemen.pdf 12 DISCUSSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS Despite asserting that children and civilians are not being deliberately targeted, the High Court ruling did not dispute the extent of the damage being wrought on civilian lives. If the UK government intends to continue to sanction the sale of arms to Saudi Arabia, it needs to be explicit that it is satisfied with the extent to which the lives of children and other civilians are being destroyed with the support of UK arms sales. Regardless of the High Court ruling, the UK is indisputably complicit in the suffering of Yemen’s children. Given the extent of this suffering, the moral case for an immediate suspension of these sales is indisputable. The UK government has also previously claimed a lack of evidence61 of human rights violations, and stated that the internal monitoring provided by the Saudi-led coalition’s Joint Incident Assessment Team (JIAT) is an adequate mechanism to review. However, it is hard to accept either the independence or credibility of this mechanism. The violations allegedly committed in Yemen are of such severity that they demand credible, independent investigation mechanisms, the evidence of which should be central in informing the UK Government’s export licensing decisions. The UK must vocally endorse the 2017 UN Secretary General’s report on Children and Armed Conflict, which lists all countries and groups that have committed grave violations against children. Saudi Arabia was initially listed in the 2016 report, but following Saudi government threats to withdraw funding from UN development projects, it was removed from the list.62 The UK and all other member states must ensure that this year Secretary General Guterres is well supported to withstand the inevitable pressure, should Saudi Arabia be listed again. 13 60 McVeigh. S. (2017) Saudi inquiry into Yemen abuse claims like ‘marking your own homework’, [online] The Guardian, 1st February 2017. Available at: https://www. theguardian.com/global-development/2017/feb/01/saudi-arabia-inquiry-yemen-abuse-claims-marking-your-own-homework-andrew-mitchell 61 House of Commons Hansard, (2015) Yemen, [online] Parliament.uk, 22nd October 2015. Available at: https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm201516/ cmhansrd/cm151022/halltext/151022h0001.htm 62 Saudi Arabia Dropped From List Of Those Harming Children; U.N. Cites Pressure (2016) http://www.npr.org/sections/parallels/2016/06/09/481426821/saudisdropped-from-list-of-those-harming-children-u-n-cites-pressure I completely understand why we have said in the first instance the Saudis should investigate these allegations. But in the end if you stand back, such investigations are only likely to carry credibility if they are seen as independent. I don’t want to belittle the issue but it’s like marking your own homework. The wider community won’t believe a one-sided investigation by the people who are the alleged perpetrators and I think that has to be carefully borne in mind.60 Former International Development Secretary Andrew Mitchell on The Saudi-led coalition investigating its own alleged breaches of international humanitarian law CONCLUSION 15 CONCLUSION The UK frequently justifies its close relationship with Saudi Arabia by highlighting how it delivers essential counter terrorism intelligence. If this is the case, the government needs to be explicit that the benefit of this intelligence justifies the sale of UK-made weapons for use in a brutal conflict that has maimed or killed thousands of children, and whose use is potentially in breach of international humanitarian law and the Arms Trade Treaty. The government also needs to be clear that any security gains outweigh the longer-term security risks of supporting such a military intervention. The government needs to publish an assessment of the extent to which a rise in resentment towards the UK could drive people towards extremist groups who plan on attacking UK citizens and assets. Saudi-led coalition airstrikes have destroyed hospitals and schools, many of which appear to have been deliberately targeted.63 It is simply unacceptable that in, the 21st century, children can be killed and starved in plain view of the world with weapons supplied by the UK and other democratic states. It is difficult to avoid the conclusion that, in supplying weapons that are enabling the Saudi-led coalition to sustain its role in the Yemeni conflict, the UK is morally and materially complicit in the suffering of Yemen’s children. The idea that Britain could profit from a conflict that annihilates thousands of children is morally abhorrent, as is its unquestioning commitment to an alliance with a country that the UN listed in 2016 as a grave violator of children’s rights in conflict. Our concerns at the UK’s policy of selling weapons to Saudi Arabia extend beyond morality. There is a strong case that this position is illegal – in selling arms to a country that is breaking international humanitarian law. We believe that the sale of arms to Saudi Arabia is damaging the UK’s international reputation. Maintaining a military and strategic alliance with a country identified as a grave violator of children’s rights undermines the country’s influence, its soft power, and the credibility of the entire post-Brexit ‘Global Britain’ agenda. It also leaves the country open to accusations of hypocrisy: how can the UK effectively criticise Russia, Iran and the Syrian Government for their attacks on children and civilians in Syria, whilst simultaneously supporting and facilitating Saudi-led coalition attacks on children and civilians in Yemen? We believe that the policy of selling arms to Saudi Arabia suffers from inherent contradictions, with different Government departments adopting policy positions that are diametrically opposed. Whilst the Foreign & Commonwealth Office and Ministry of Defence focus on promoting arms sales to Saudi Arabia, and providing diplomatic cover and support for the Saudi-led coalition’s war in Yemen, the Department for International Development is providing vast amounts of humanitarian aid to address the crisis fuelled by these very arms sales. The UK public has for many years been uncomfortable with the idea that UK firms export lethal weapons to regimes around the world. The arms export licensing system is designed to reassure UK voters that arms sales can continue without damaging the reputation of the UK due to complicity in war crimes. The failure of this system to prevent arms sales to a country found to be using them to commit war crimes seriously undermines public trust in the export license system. There is a risk that the UK public will lose patience with the UK arms trade and demand a complete cessation of all overseas arms sales. It is in the long-term interest of UK Peep's that the arms manufacturing industry must be immediately shut down and the sale and distribution of weapons halted !!

Arms industry statistics


Arms industry statistics

http://researchbriefings.parliament.uk/ResearchBriefing/Summary/CBP-7842

This paper provides a digest of current statistics on the arms industry.


According to figures published by the Government on 26 July 2016, the global defence export market in 2015 was estimated to be worth more than £63 billion ($97 billion). The five permanent members of the UN Security Council – the United States of America, Russia, China, France and the United Kingdom – are the world’s largest arms exporters. The UK is the third largest defence exporter in the world with its market share estimated at £7.7 billion (US $12 billion), representing 12.8% of the estimated market share of the top ten defence exporters).[1]

An arms industry database published annually by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI)[2], and containing information on the 100 largest arms-producing and military services companies in the world, shows that UK companies feature consistently in the top 100 listing.

According to Government figures, the UK’s largest defence export market is the Middle East, responsible for an estimated 58% of orders between 2006 and 2015, followed by North America with an estimated 20% of orders.

The Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) has developed a unit of measurement to measure volumes of arms exports: the trend-indicator value (TIV). The TIV is based on the known unit production costs of a core set of weapons in constant 1990 US dollars. Second hand-weapons which have been significantly reconditioned are given a value 66 per cent of that of a new weapon; those which have not been significantly reconditioned are given a value 40 per cent of that of a new weapon.[3]

Based on this, Saudi Arabia has consistently been the UK’s top export market for the last 5 years, receiving two-thirds of the UK arms exports in 2015. During the same period, UK companies have been second only to US companies in exporting arms to Saudi Arabia.



[1] UK Trade and Investment, Additional Statistics - Top Defence Exporters 2015: table, 26 July 2016

[2] SIPRI is an so called "independent" international institute dedicated to providing data, analysis and recommendations on its research into conflict, armaments, arms control and disarmament.

[3] SIPRI arms transfer database importer/exporter TIV tables, accessed 18 August 2016


Commons Briefing papers CBP-7842

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The Register of Members' declared Financial Interests  As at 161121

https://publications.parliament.uk/pa/cm/cmregmem/161121/contents.htm



The Register of Members' Financial Interests is published soon after the beginning of a new Parliament, under the authority of the Committee on Standards and Privileges, and annually thereafter. Between publications the Register is regularly updated electronically and is available for public inspection in the Search Room of the Parliamentary Archives. These amendments are also reflected in the Internet edition which is current as at 161121.

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Contents

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

A

Abbott, Ms Diane

Abrahams, Debbie

Adams, Nigel

Afriyie, Adam

Ahmed-Sheikh, Ms Tasmina

Aldous, Peter

Alexander, Heidi

Ali, Rushanara

Allan, Lucy

Allen, Mr Graham

Allen, Heidi

Allin-Khan, Dr Rosena

Amess, Sir David

Anderson, Mr David

Andrew, Stuart

Ansell, Caroline

Argar, Edward

Arkless, Richard

Ashworth, Jonathan

Atkins, Victoria

Austin, Ian
B

Bacon, Mr Richard

Bailey, Mr Adrian

Baker, Mr Steve

Baldwin, Harriett

Barclay, Stephen

Bardell, Hannah

Baron, Mr John

Barron, Sir Kevin

Barwell, Gavin

Bebb, Guto

Beckett, Margaret

Bellingham, Sir Henry

Benn, Hilary

Benyon, Richard

Bercow, John

Beresford, Sir Paul

Berger, Luciana

Berry, Jake

Berry, James

Betts, Mr Clive

Bingham, Andrew

Black, Mhairi

Blackford, Ian

Blackman-Woods, Dr Roberta

Blackman, Bob

Blackman, Kirsty

Blackwood, Nicola

Blenkinsop, Tom

Blomfield, Paul

Blunt, Crispin

Boles, Nick

Bone, Mr Peter

Borwick, Victoria

Boswell, Philip

Bottomley, Sir Peter

Brabin, Tracy

Bradley, Karen

Bradshaw, Mr Ben

Brady, Mr Graham

Brady, Mickey

Brake, Tom

Brazier, Mr Julian

Brennan, Kevin

Bridgen, Andrew

Brine, Steve

Brock, Deidre

Brokenshire, James

Brown, Alan

Brown, Lyn

Brown, Mr Nicholas

Bruce, Fiona

Bryant, Chris

Buck, Ms Karen

Buckland, Robert

Burden, Richard

Burgon, Richard

Burnham, Andy

Burns, Conor

Burns, Sir Simon

Burrowes, Mr David

Burt, Alistair

Butler, Dawn

Byrne, Liam
C

Cadbury, Ruth

Cairns, Alun

Cameron, Dr Lisa

Campbell, Mr Alan

Campbell, Mr Gregory

Campbell, Mr Ronnie

Carmichael, Mr Alistair

Carmichael, Neil

Carswell, Mr Douglas

Cartlidge, James

Cash, Sir William

Caulfield, Maria

Chalk, Alex

Champion, Sarah

Chapman, Douglas

Chapman, Jenny

Cherry, Joanna

Chishti, Rehman

Chope, Mr Christopher

Churchill, Jo

Clark, Greg

Clarke, Mr Kenneth

Clegg, Mr Nick

Cleverly, James

Clifton-Brown, Geoffrey

Clwyd, Ann

Coaker, Vernon

Coffey, Ann

Coffey, Dr Thérèse

Collins, Damian

Colvile, Oliver

Cooper, Julie

Cooper, Rosie

Cooper, Yvette

Corbyn, Jeremy

Costa, Alberto

Courts, Robert

Cowan, Ronnie

Cox, Mr Geoffrey

Coyle, Neil

Crabb, Stephen

Crausby, Mr David

Crawley, Angela

Creagh, Mary

Creasy, Stella

Crouch, Tracey

Cruddas, Jon

Cryer, John

Cummins, Judith

Cunningham, Alex

Cunningham, Mr Jim
D

Dakin, Nic

Danczuk, Simon

David, Wayne

Davies, Byron

Davies, Chris

Davies, David T. C.

Davies, Geraint

Davies, Glyn

Davies, Dr James

Davies, Mims

Davies, Philip

Davis, Mr David

Day, Martyn

De Piero, Gloria

Debbonaire, Thangam

Dinenage, Caroline

Djanogly, Mr Jonathan

Docherty-Hughes, Martin

Dodds, Mr Nigel

Doherty, Mr Pat

Donaldson, Sir Jeffrey M.

Donaldson, Stuart Blair

Donelan, Michelle

Dorries, Nadine

Double, Steve

Doughty, Stephen

Dowd, Jim

Dowd, Peter

Dowden, Oliver

Doyle-Price, Jackie

Drax, Richard

Dromey, Jack

Drummond, Mrs Flick

Duddridge, James

Dugher, Michael

Duncan Smith, Mr Iain

Duncan, Sir Alan

Dunne, Mr Philip

Durkan, Mark
E

Eagle, Ms Angela

Eagle, Maria

Edwards, Jonathan

Efford, Clive

Elliott, Julie

Elliott, Tom

Ellis, Michael

Ellison, Jane

Ellman, Mrs Louise

Ellwood, Mr Tobias

Elmore, Chris

Elphicke, Charlie

Engel, Natascha

Esterson, Bill

Eustice, George

Evans, Chris

Evans, Graham

Evans, Mr Nigel

Evennett, David
F

Fabricant, Michael

Fallon, Sir Michael

Farrelly, Paul

Farron, Tim

Fellows, Marion

Fernandes, Suella

Ferrier, Margaret

Field, Frank

Field, Mark

Fitzpatrick, Jim

Flello, Robert

Fletcher, Colleen

Flint, Caroline

Flynn, Paul

Foster, Kevin

Fovargue, Yvonne

Fox, Dr Liam

Foxcroft, Vicky

Francois, Mr Mark

Frazer, Lucy

Freeman, George

Freer, Mike

Fuller, Richard

Furniss, Gill

Fysh, Marcus
G

Gale, Sir Roger

Gapes, Mike

Gardiner, Barry

Garnier, Sir Edward

Garnier, Mark

Gauke, Mr David

Gethins, Stephen

Ghani, Nusrat

Gibb, Nick

Gibson, Patricia

Gillan, Mrs Cheryl

Glass, Pat

Glen, John

Glindon, Mary

Godsiff, Mr Roger

Goodman, Helen

Goodwill, Mr Robert

Gove, Michael

Grady, Patrick

Graham, Richard

Grant, Mrs Helen

Grant, Peter

Gray, James

Gray, Neil

Grayling, Chris

Green, Chris

Green, Damian

Green, Kate

Greening, Justine

Greenwood, Lilian

Greenwood, Margaret

Grieve, Mr Dominic

Griffith, Nia

Griffiths, Andrew

Gummer, Ben

Gwynne, Andrew

Gyimah, Mr Sam
H

Haigh, Louise

Halfon, Robert

Hall, Luke

Hamilton, Fabian

Hammond, Mr Philip

Hammond, Stephen

Hancock, Matt

Hands, Greg

Hanson, Mr David

Harman, Ms Harriet

Harper, Mr Mark

Harrington, Richard

Harris, Carolyn

Harris, Rebecca

Hart, Simon

Haselhurst, Sir Alan

Hayes, Helen

Hayes, Mr John

Hayman, Sue

Heald, Sir Oliver

Healey, John

Heappey, James

Heaton-Harris, Chris

Heaton-Jones, Peter

Henderson, Gordon

Hendrick, Mr Mark

Hendry, Drew

Hepburn, Mr Stephen

Herbert, Nick

Hermon, Lady

Hillier, Meg

Hinds, Damian

Hoare, Simon

Hodge, Dame Margaret

Hodgson, Mrs Sharon

Hoey, Kate

Hollern, Kate

Hollingbery, George

Hollinrake, Kevin

Hollobone, Mr Philip

Holloway, Adam

Hopkins, Kelvin

Hopkins, Kris

Hosie, Stewart

Howarth, Mr George

Howarth, Sir Gerald

Howell, John

Howlett, Ben

Hoyle, Mr Lindsay

Huddleston, Nigel

Hunt, Mr Jeremy

Hunt, Tristram

Huq, Dr Rupa

Hurd, Mr Nick

Hussain, Imran
I
J

Jackson, Mr Stewart

James, Margot

Jarvis, Dan

Javid, Sajid

Jayawardena, Mr Ranil

Jenkin, Mr Bernard

Jenkyns, Andrea

Jenrick, Robert

Johnson, Alan

Johnson, Boris

Johnson, Diana

Johnson, Gareth

Johnson, Joseph

Jones, Andrew

Jones, Mr David

Jones, Gerald

Jones, Graham

Jones, Helen

Jones, Mr Kevan

Jones, Mr Marcus

Jones, Susan Elan
K

Kane, Mike

Kaufman, Sir Gerald

Kawczynski, Daniel

Keeley, Barbara

Kendall, Liz

Kennedy, Seema

Kerevan, George

Kerr, Calum

Kinahan, Danny

Kinnock, Stephen

Kirby, Simon

Knight, Sir Greg

Knight, Julian

Kwarteng, Kwasi

Kyle, Peter
L

Laing, Mrs Eleanor

Lamb, Norman

Lammy, Mr David

Lancaster, Mark

Latham, Pauline

Lavery, Ian

Law, Chris

Leadsom, Andrea

Lee, Dr Phillip

Lefroy, Jeremy

Leigh, Sir Edward

Leslie, Charlotte

Leslie, Chris

Letwin, Sir Oliver

Lewell-Buck, Mrs Emma

Lewis, Brandon

Lewis, Clive

Lewis, Mr Ivan

Lewis, Dr Julian

Liddell-Grainger, Mr Ian

Lidington, Mr David

Lilley, Mr Peter

Long Bailey, Rebecca

Lopresti, Jack

Lord, Mr Jonathan

Loughton, Tim

Lucas, Caroline

Lucas, Ian C.

Lumley, Karen

Lynch, Holly
M

Mackinlay, Craig

Mackintosh, David

MacNeil, Angus Brendan

Mactaggart, Fiona

Madders, Justin

Mahmood, Mr Khalid

Mahmood, Shabana

Main, Mrs Anne

Mak, Mr Alan

Malhotra, Seema

Malthouse, Kit

Mann, John

Mann, Scott

Marris, Rob

Marsden, Gordon

Maskell, Rachael

Maskey, Paul

Matheson, Christian

Mathias, Dr Tania

May, Mrs Theresa

Maynard, Paul

Mc Nally, John

McCabe, Steve

McCaig, Callum

McCarthy, Kerry

McCartney, Jason

McCartney, Karl

McDonagh, Siobhain

McDonald, Andy

McDonald, Stewart Malcolm

McDonald, Stuart C.

McDonnell, Dr Alasdair

McDonnell, John

McFadden, Mr Pat

McGarry, Natalie

McGinn, Conor

McGovern, Alison

McInnes, Liz

McKinnell, Catherine

McLaughlin, Anne

McLoughlin, Sir Patrick

McMahon, Jim

McPartland, Stephen

Meale, Sir Alan

Mearns, Ian

Menzies, Mark

Mercer, Johnny

Merriman, Huw

Metcalfe, Stephen

Miliband, Edward

Miller, Mrs Maria

Milling, Amanda

Mills, Nigel

Milton, Anne

Mitchell, Mr Andrew

Molloy, Francie

Monaghan, Carol

Monaghan, Dr Paul

Moon, Mrs Madeleine

Mordaunt, Penny

Morden, Jessica

Morgan, Nicky

Morris, Anne Marie

Morris, David

Morris, Grahame

Morris, James

Morton, Wendy

Mowat, David

Mulholland, Greg

Mullin, Roger

Mundell, David

Murray, Ian

Murray, Mrs Sheryll

Murrison, Dr Andrew
N

Nandy, Lisa

Neill, Robert

Newlands, Gavin

Newton, Sarah

Nicolson, John

Nokes, Caroline

Norman, Jesse

Nuttall, Mr David
O

Offord, Dr Matthew

O'Hara, Brendan

Onn, Melanie

Onwurah, Chi

Opperman, Guy

Osamor, Kate

Osborne, Mr George

Oswald, Kirsten

Owen, Albert
P

Paisley, Ian

Parish, Neil

Patel, Priti

Paterson, Mr Owen

Paterson, Steven

Pawsey, Mark

Pearce, Teresa

Penning, Mike

Pennycook, Matthew

Penrose, John

Percy, Andrew

Perkins, Toby

Perry, Claire

Phillips, Jess

Phillipson, Bridget

Philp, Chris

Pickles, Sir Eric

Pincher, Christopher

Poulter, Dr Dan

Pound, Stephen

Pow, Rebecca

Powell, Lucy

Prentis, Victoria

Prisk, Mr Mark

Pritchard, Mark

Pugh, John

Pursglove, Tom
Q

Quin, Jeremy

Quince, Will

Qureshi, Yasmin
R

Raab, Dominic

Rayner, Angela

Redwood, John

Reed, Mr Jamie

Reed, Mr Steve

Rees-Mogg, Mr Jacob

Rees, Christina

Reeves, Rachel

Reynolds, Emma

Reynolds, Jonathan

Rimmer, Marie

Ritchie, Ms Margaret

Robertson, Angus

Robertson, Mr Laurence

Robinson, Gavin

Robinson, Mr Geoffrey

Robinson, Mary

Rosindell, Andrew

Rotheram, Steve

Rudd, Amber

Rutley, David

Ryan, Joan
S

Salmond, Alex

Sandbach, Antoinette

Saville Roberts, Liz

Scully, Paul

Selous, Andrew

Shah, Naz

Shannon, Jim

Shapps, Grant

Sharma, Alok

Sharma, Mr Virendra

Sheerman, Mr Barry

Shelbrooke, Alec

Sheppard, Tommy

Sherriff, Paula

Shuker, Mr Gavin

Siddiq, Tulip

Simpson, David

Simpson, Mr Keith

Skidmore, Chris

Skinner, Mr Dennis

Slaughter, Andy

Smeeth, Ruth

Smith, Mr Andrew

Smith, Angela

Smith, Cat

Smith, Chloe

Smith, Henry

Smith, Jeff

Smith, Julian

Smith, Nick

Smith, Owen

Smith, Royston

Smyth, Karin

Soames, Sir Nicholas

Solloway, Amanda

Soubry, Anna

Spellar, John

Spelman, Dame Caroline

Spencer, Mark

Starmer, Keir

Stephens, Chris

Stephenson, Andrew

Stevens, Jo

Stevenson, John

Stewart, Bob

Stewart, Iain

Stewart, Rory

Streeter, Mr Gary

Streeting, Wes

Stride, Mel

Stringer, Graham

Stuart, Ms Gisela

Stuart, Graham

Sturdy, Julian

Sunak, Rishi

Swayne, Sir Desmond

Swire, Sir Hugo

Syms, Mr Robert
T

Tami, Mark

Thewliss, Alison

Thomas-Symonds, Nick

Thomas, Derek

Thomas, Gareth

Thompson, Owen

Thomson, Michelle

Thornberry, Emily

Throup, Maggie

Timms, Stephen

Timpson, Edward

Tolhurst, Kelly

Tomlinson, Justin

Tomlinson, Michael

Tracey, Craig

Tredinnick, David

Trevelyan, Mrs Anne-Marie

Trickett, Jon

Truss, Elizabeth

Tugendhat, Tom

Turley, Anna

Turner, Mr Andrew

Turner, Karl

Twigg, Derek

Twigg, Stephen

Tyrie, Mr Andrew
U

Umunna, Mr Chuka
V

Vaizey, Mr Edward

Vara, Mr Shailesh

Vaz, Keith

Vaz, Valerie

Vickers, Martin

Villiers, Mrs Theresa
W

Walker, Mr Charles

Walker, Mr Robin

Wallace, Mr Ben

Warburton, David

Warman, Matt

Watkinson, Dame Angela

Watson, Tom

Weir, Mike

West, Catherine

Wharton, James

Whately, Helen

Wheeler, Heather

White, Chris

Whiteford, Dr Eilidh

Whitehead, Dr Alan

Whitford, Dr Philippa

Whittaker, Craig

Whittingdale, Mr John

Wiggin, Bill

Williams, Craig

Williams, Hywel

Williams, Mr Mark

Williamson, Gavin

Wilson, Corri

Wilson, Phil

Wilson, Mr Rob

Wilson, Sammy

Winnick, Mr David

Winterton, Dame Rosie

Wishart, Pete

Wollaston, Dr Sarah

Wood, Mike

Woodcock, John

Wragg, William

Wright, Mr Iain

Wright, Jeremy
X
Y
Z

Zahawi, Nadhim



Zeichner, Daniel